NOT A BOOK REVIEW: we don’t talk about it. ever. — Niki Malherbe

I have just come from a talk by the author of the book, ‘We don’t talk about it ever’. Desiree – Anne Martin. I’ve met her several times in writer’s circles but never heard her speak about her story or read her book. While I still hold some of my feelings in tact, having let […]

NOT A BOOK REVIEW: we don’t talk about it. ever. — Niki Malherbe

please support my word habit.

https://www.patreon.com/believemoredeeply

words are my drug of choice. i am in love with the lyrical nature of language. i taste and digest words, slowly, so as not to miss a marvellous morsel.

i am passionate about punctuation; seduced by syntax. i find innate value in verbs and allure in adjectives.

please support me on my writing journey, from as little as the cost of a cappuccino a month, so that i may continue to manifest magical manuscripts and pursue my penchant for poetry.

thank you.

happy birthday, truth.

It was three years ago, this month, that I decided to crack open the most vulnerable parts of myself and start this blog. It was three years ago that I decided to share my most sacred truths and “heart scribblings” with the world.

I was brave and courageous and scared shitless. The usual committee meeting in my head tore out their hair and wailed and there was much gnashing of teeth. “Why?”, they screamed in unison. “Why would we let people, friends, strangers, know our innermost secrets? We are secret-keepers. It is our legacy. We will be breaking all the rules!”

Oh, fuck the rules.

I felt determined to end the painful pattern, to break the sickening cycle, for myself and for others who I hoped my words would resonate with and would come to rest on their hearts. Yes, I was ballsy then. I furiously penned short stories and poems, purging the secrets and the damning lies. The blog started something: my own revolution. The one that starts when you simply whisper to yourself, “Yes, I love you.”

The blog formed the essential framework for what would become my book, my published memoir, “We Don’t Talk About It. Ever.” It formed the brave blueprint for a long-held dream that eventually came true a year ago. But it also started a conversation. People responded saying, “I felt that way too!” and there was an insistence that we must start talking about the stigmatised issues such as abuse, trauma, identity, addiction, mental health issues. It had always been my hope that my words touch just one person but they pierced the thinking of so many for which I am eternally grateful. Thank you, everyone who has read the book, who follows my blog. Thank you for holding my words so gently in the palms of your hands.

I have to admit: I’m not feeling particularly brave today. In fact, I’m caught up in one of my unpredictable and overpowering cycles of hopelessness and hurt. I feel hollow and empty and there is no particular reason why. That’s the fun part of having bipolar: you never know when or in what form or why its going to hit you. This feels like being punched in the gut repeatedly by a prize-fighter. But I can’t be quarantined or cosseted away somewhere. I have to do what I have to do even if it feels like I’m dragging my broken bones. I’m even surprised I wrote this. In moments like these, I lose my words entirely.

The reason I’m writing that is because three years ago, I vowed to speak my truth. I pledged to purge the pain and strip myself naked and live my truth. And this is my truth today: everything changes, anything is possible, where there truth there is hope.

And there is always hope. Always.

Believe more deeply; hold your face up to the Light even though, for the moment, you do not see.

Bill W. Co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous.